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Meet Our Leadership Team

NOAA Fisheries employs about 4,800 staff including scientists, policy managers, and enforcement officers, located across the country at our regional offices, science centers and labs, and national headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland. Below you will find the leaders of our agency.

Eileen Sobeck
Eileen Sobeck
Assistant Administrator for Fisheries
» View Bio

Paul Doremus, Ph.D.
Paul Doremus, Ph.D.
Deputy Assistant Administrator for Operations
» View Bio

Richard Merrick, Ph.D.
Richard L. Merrick, Ph.D.
Director, Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor
» View Bio

Samuel D. Rauch III
Samuel D. Rauch III
Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs
» View Bio

Matthew Brandt

(Acting) Director, Office of Law Enforcement
» View Bio

Ned Cyr, Ph.D.
Ned Cyr, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Science and Technology
» View Bio

Tim Hansen
Tim Hansen
Director, Seafood Inspection Program
» View Bio

Natalie Huff
Natalie Huff
Equal Employment Opportunity/Diversity Manager
» View Bio


Kate Naughten
Kate Naughten
Director, Office of Communications and External Affairs
» View Bio

Jean-Pierre Plé, Ph.D.
Jean-Pierre Plé, Ph.D.
(Acting) Director, Office of International Affairs
» View Bio

Gary Reisner
Gary Reisner
Director, Office of Management and Budget
» View Bio

Alan D. Risenhoover
Alan D. Risenhoover
Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries
» View Bio


Michael Rubino, Ph.D.
Michael Rubino, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Aquaculture
» View Bio

Buck Sutter
Buck Sutter
Director, Office of Habitat Conservation
» View Bio

Larry Tyminski
Larry Tyminski
Chief Information Officer
» View Bio

Donna Wieting
Donna Wieting
Director, Office of Protected Resources
» View Bio


Vacant, Director, Office of Policy

James W. Balsiger, Ph.D.
James W. Balsiger, Ph.D.
Regional Administrator, Alaska Region
» View Bio

John K. Bullard
John K. Bullard
Regional Administrator, Greater Atlantic Region
» View Bio

Roy E. Crabtree, Ph.D.
Roy E. Crabtree, Ph.D.
Regional Administrator, Southeast Region
» View Bio

Will Stelle
Will Stelle
Regional Administrator, West Coast Region
» View Bio


Michael D. Tosatto
Michael D. Tosatto
Regional Administrator, Pacific Islands Region
» View Bio

Douglas DeMaster, Ph.D.
Douglas DeMaster, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
» View Bio

William A. Karp, Ph.D.
William A. Karp, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Northeast Fisheries Science Center
» View Bio

Bonnie Ponwith, Ph.D.
Bonnie Ponwith, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Southeast Fisheries Science Center
» View Bio

Samuel Pooley, Ph.D.
Samuel Pooley, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center
» View Bio


John E. Stein, Ph.D.
John E. Stein, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
» View Bio

Francisco Werner, Ph.D.
Francisco Werner, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Southwest Fisheries Science Center
» View Bio

Eileen SobeckEileen Sobeck
Assistant Administrator for Fisheries


Ms. Sobeck was appointed Assistant Administrator for Fisheries in January 2014. In this role, she oversees the management and conservation of marine fisheries and the protection of marine mammals, sea turtles, and coastal fisheries habitat within the U.S. exclusive economic zone. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) protects and preserves the nation's living marine resources through scientific research, fisheries management, law enforcement, and habitat conservation. Her focus is on rebuilding the nation's fisheries and the jobs and livelihoods that depend on them by promoting management approaches that will achieve both sustainable fisheries and vibrant coastal communities. The agency has about 4,800 employees in six regional offices, six science centers, and more than 20 laboratories across the country. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries, Ms. Sobeck was the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks at the U.S. Department of the Interior, and prior to that, she spent 25 years at the U.S. Department of Justice Environment and National Resources Division where she served as Chief of Wildlife and Marine Resources for several years among other leadership roles. While at the Department of Justice, she received a Presidential Rank Award (2006). However, her real roots were with NOAA’s Office of General Counsel where she started her federal career in 1979. Ms. Sobeck has her undergraduate and law degree from Stanford.

Paul Doremus, Ph.D.Paul Doremus, Ph.D.
Deputy Assistant Administrator for Operations


In his role as Deputy Assistant Administrator for Operations, Dr. Doremus serves as the Chief Operating Officer, responsible for the day-to-day management of the agency's operations. This is a critical leadership position that oversees NOAA Fisheries' financial and business processes; works to strategically align and improve the performance of NOAA Fisheries, in collaboration with other NOAA line offices; and ensures NOAA Fisheries has effective and efficient infrastructure for its mission, ranging from fleet and facilities to information technology and workforce. Before coming to NOAA Fisheries, he was the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Program Planning and Integration. In this position, he was responsible for NOAA's long-term strategic plan, NOAA-wide strategy implementation, and NOAA's corporate performance evaluation methods and measures. Prior to joining NOAA in 2005, Dr. Doremus served as Director of the Program Office for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where he led the development and implementation of NIST's long-range strategic plan and associated performance evaluation system and practices; provided the NIST Director and senior managers with technical, economic, policy, and program analyses and counsel; and helped NIST improve its relationships with government and private sector customers and stakeholders. From 1995 to 1997, he served as a Senior Analyst in the Commerce Department's Office of Technology Policy, following his position as Project Director in the congressional Office of Technology Assessment (1992–1995). His work experience and academic background center on corporate strategy and performance management, portfolio planning and evaluation, science and technology policy, and the intersection of economics and public policy. He received his B.A. in Political Science from the Pennsylvania State University and his Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University.

Richard L. Merrick, Ph.D.Richard Merrick, Ph.D.
Director, Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor


Dr. Merrick began serving as Director of Scientific Programs and Chief Science Advisor in 2011. In this capacity, he leads NOAA Fisheries' efforts to provide the science needed to support sustainable fisheries and ecosystems and to continue the Nation's progress in ending overfishing, rebuilding fish populations, saving critical species, and preserving vital habitats. As the head of NOAA Fisheries' scientific operations, Dr. Merrick directs NOAA's six regional Fisheries Science Centers, including 30 laboratories. He joined NOAA Fisheries in 1985 as a marine mammal staff scientist at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center. In 1997, he transferred to the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, where he initially served as Branch Chief for Protected Species, and then as Chief of the Resource Evaluation and Assessment Division where he directed the Center's assessment, ecological, and social science research for fish and protected species. He has led various regional and national efforts to improve fishery and protected resources science, and has broad experience in dealing with a wide variety of controversial fishery and protected species issues. Dr. Merrick's holds a Ph.D. in Fisheries from the University of Washington; M.S. degrees in Biological Oceanography and in Marine Resource Management from Oregon State University; and an M.S. in City and Regional Planning and a B.S. from Clemson University.

Samuel D. Rauch III
Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs


Mr. Rauch has served as the Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs since 2006, though taking a two-year reprieve from this role to oversee the agency’s core missions as the Acting Assistant Administrator for Fisheries from 2012 to 2013. In his deputy role, he oversees NOAA Fisheries' regulatory actions and programs, including those to support the conservation and recovery of marine mammals and endangered species; ensure economically and biologically sustainable fisheries; and promote habitat stewardship through restoration and conservation. Coordination of the NOAA Fisheries' aquaculture activities and outreach, and the agency’s National Environmental Policy Act programs are also under his purview. From 2004 to 2006, he served as the Assistant General Counsel for Fisheries where he supervised a team of attorneys, paralegals, and support staff responsible for providing legal counsel to NOAA Fisheries. Prior to joining NOAA, Mr. Rauch served as a trial attorney and the Assistant Section Chief for the Wildlife and Marine Resources Section of the Environment and Natural Resources Division, U.S. Department of Justice. Mr. Rauch holds a J.D. from the Northwestern School of Law of Lewis & Clark College, an M.S. from the University of Georgia, and a B.A. from the University of Virginia. He has also received many honors during his career, including NOAA General Counsel Awards (1998, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2010); Department of Justice Special Achievement Awards (1997, 1998, 2000, 2002); and Department of Commerce Gold Medal (2007), Bronze Medal (2011), and the Presidential Rank Award (2011).

Matthew Brandt
(Acting) Director, Office of Law Enforcement


Matthew Brandt is the Acting Director of NOAA's Office of Law Enforcement, which enforces more than 35 federal statutes that protect our Nation's living marine resources and their natural habitat (e.g., Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, Lacey Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, and Endangered Species Act). The agency's jurisdiction spans more than 3 million square miles of open ocean, more than 85,000 miles of U.S. coastline, the country's National Marine Sanctuaries and Marine National Monuments, as well as U.S. treaties and international law governing the high seas and international trade. Prior to joining NOAA in 2014, Mr. Brandt served as Deputy Assistant Director for Operations in the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Protective Service, where he oversaw all law enforcement operational units. He is a veteran of the U.S. Navy where he left as a chief petty officer after serving tours of duty at the White House as a member of President Reagan’s Ceremonial Guard, three overseas tours aboard the USS Duluth LPD-6, and as a recruit drill instructor in San Diego, California. His law enforcement career spans 22 years, most of it in the Pacific Northwest in his home state of Oregon where he was a patrol officer, patrol sergeant, and detective sergeant with county and municipal agencies.

Ned Cyr, Ph.D.Ned Cyr, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Science and Technology


Dr. Cyr was selected as the Director of the Office of Science and Technology in 2009. He joined NOAA in 1992. He has served as an international affairs specialist with NOAA's Office of International Affairs, a fisheries biologist with the NOAA Fisheries Office of Protected Resources, head of the Ocean Science and Living Resources Program of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO, and, most recently, chief of the Marine Ecosystems Division in the Office of Science and Technology. His interests include fisheries oceanography, the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems, ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, the design and implementation of large-scale marine ecological observing systems, and international ocean science. Dr. Cyr was the technical secretary for the Living Marine Resources Panel of the Global Ocean Observing System, and coordinator of the NOAA Fisheries Ecosystem Principles Advisory Panel. He received his Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Carolina and his B.S. from the University of Notre Dame.

Tim HansenTim Hansen
Director, Seafood Inspection Program


Mr. Hansen began his career in the seafood processing business holding several quality assurance and production positions in Washington State and Alaska.In 1985, he joined the NOAA Fisheries Inspection Program as an intermittent inspector in Seattle. He was quickly transferred to Los Angeles California and promoted to Deputy Regional Chief Inspector in 1987 and held that position through 1991. In 1992, he was selected to be the Director of Field Operations for the Inspection Program. During this period he worked with NOAA Fisheries staff and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under a proposed joint voluntary Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) program that was important to the implementation of the concept to the seafood industry for both agencies. In 1996, he became the Director of Technical Services for the Seafood Inspection Program, leading a group of trainers and scientists who supported the program and industry. In 1998, Mr. Hansen joined the FDA Office of Seafood at the beginning of the implementation phase of the seafood HACCP regulation. He became a branch chief in 1999 and a Division Director in 2003. During this period he was heavily involved in the work of the Codex Fish Committee work and the international implementation of the seafood HACCP regulation. In August 2006 Mr. Hansen became the Director of the NOAA Seafood Inspection Program.

Natalie HuffNatalie Huff
Equal Employment Opportunity/Diversity Manager


Ms. Huff has been a Department of Commerce employee since 1978. She has worked with the Employee Development Division, one of the many offices in the Office of the Secretary's Personnel Office. In 1988, she joined the International Trade Administration (ITA) as an Employee Development Specialist/Awards Officer. In this capacity she was responsible for the development of several training programs and the management of the ITA Awards Program. In 1992, she was selected by NOAA Fisheries to serve as a Management Program Analyst in the Office of Management Services. In this capacity she managed the training program, awards, and many day-to-day management functions. In 1995, she was appointed to serve as the National Program Manager for Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and later as the Human Resources Team Leader in the Operations, Management, and Information Office. Following the inception of the NOAA Diversity Office, Natalie was appointed by the Assistant Administrator to serve as the National Program Manager for EEO and Diversity.

Jean-Pierre Plé, Ph.D.Jean-Pierre Plé
(Acting) Director, Office of International Affairs


As Acting Director of the Office of International Affairs, Dr. Plé's primary responsibilities are to promote, through international collaboration and engagement, the sustainable management of living marine resources of interest to the U.S., and to ensure effective policy coordination throughout the agency's headquarters and regional offices. His areas of concentration are office leadership and direction, strategic planning, and staff development, and he also serves on the NOAA International Affairs Council. Before joining NOAA Fisheries in 2005, Dr. Plé served in the Department of State for 10 years, first in the Office of Marine Conservation and then in the Office of Oceans Affairs. Earlier in his career, Dr. Plé served as a John Knauss Marine Policy Fellow with the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. He is a graduate of the Federal Executive Institute's Leadership for a Democratic Society, and has completed the Department of Commerce Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program. He also served as a Fellow in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Seminar XXI Program on Foreign Policy, International Relations, and the National Interest. In addition to his civilian career, Dr. Plé served 30 years in the U.S. Navy/Navy Reserve as a Surface Warfare Officer, retiring at the rank of Captain. He currently supports, as a volunteer, the U.S. Naval Academy's Offshore Sailing Training Squadron. Dr. Plé earned a Ph.D. in Marine Studies from the University of Delaware, a Masters degree in Natural Resource Economics and Environmental Policy from Duke University, and a B.A. in International Relations from the University of Wisconsin.

Kate NaughtenKate Naughten
Director, Office of Communications and External Affairs


In her role as Director of the Office of Communications and External Affairs, Ms. Naughten manages strategic communications for NOAA Fisheries including internal, external, and online communications and the implementation of the NOAA Fisheries National Communications Strategy. In addition, she oversees the agency's Teacher at Sea Program and Education Program. She also chairs the agency's Regional Communications Council. Previously she served as the first National Outreach Coordinator for NOAA's Office of Aquaculture, the public affairs officer for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, and a constituent services liaison and a public affairs officer for NOAA Fisheries. She joined NOAA in 2000 after serving 5 years as the Communications Director for the Chesapeake Bay Program. She holds a B.A. in Media Communications from Loyola University in Maryland.

Gary ReisnerGary Reisner
Director, Office of Management and Budget


Mr. Reisner serves as the agency's Chief Financial Officer responsible for advising the Assistant Administrator and agency leadership on agency-wide objectives, measures of accomplishment, and distribution of resources among the agency's management units. In addition to these planning and monitoring elements, he oversees the Office of Management and Budget, which provides for the agency's administrative processes, budget formulation and execution, strategic planning, performance management and oversight, facility and safety management, grants coordination, audit coordination and oversight development, human resource management, and loan financing services. Prior to his current position, he worked at the White House Office of Management and Budget where he oversaw policy and program development of the NOAA budget and the performance of the Commerce Department under the President's Management Agenda. He brings experience in developing and implementing government-wide natural resources initiatives including Lands Legacy and the Conservation Spending Category, recommendations of former President Bush's Task Force on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Development, and guiding development and review of the first Interior Department Strategic Plan. Mr. Reisner has an M.S. in Natural Resource Economics and more than 20 years of federal service devoted to advancing public policy on natural resource management and related science. He has been involved with and a supporter of research that fosters economic and politically feasible solutions to many of the Nation's environmental and management conflicts.

Alan D. Risenhoover
Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries


Since 2006, Mr. Risenhoover has served as the Director of the Office of Sustainable Fisheries, though appointed as the Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs from 2012 to 2013. He oversees regulatory and management activities related to Atlantic highly migratory species, national fisheries policy development and implementation, domestic fisheries regulatory coordination, Atlantic Coastal Act implementation, outreach and constituent services, and food safety risk analysis. The Office also tracks the agency's commitment to ensuring sustainable fisheries and science-based management through an annual Status of the Stocks Report and the Fish Stock Sustainability Index. He started his federal career with NOAA Fisheries in 1989, and has served in several key national positions including Acting Director for Office of Law Enforcement; Deputy Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries; and Deputy Chief Financial Officer/Deputy Chief Administrative Officer. He came to Washington, D.C., in 1988 as a Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow. Mr. Risenhoover holds a B.S. in Aquatic Zoology from Colorado State University and an M.S. in Fish and Wildlife Sciences from Texas A&M University.

Michael Rubino, Ph.D.Michael Rubino, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Aquaculture


Dr. Rubino joined NOAA in late 2004 to lead the agency's renewed commitment to marine aquaculture. Most recently, he was the manager of New Funds Development for the World Bank's Carbon Finance Group. In the 1990s, he worked at the International Finance Corporation, a private sector affiliate of the World Bank, where he developed renewable energy and biodiversity investment funds. Earlier he was the president of an aquaculture R&D company and a partner in a shrimp farm in South Carolina. He also served as vice-chairman of the State of Maryland's Aquaculture Advisory Committee. He holds a Ph.D. in Natural Resources from the University of Michigan.

Buck SutterBuck Sutter
Director, Office of Habitat Conservation


Mr. Sutter oversees the implementation of the NOAA Habitat Blueprint and the Regional Initiatives for Fisheries, as well as managing programs on fish passage, essential fish habitat protection, coral conservation, Restoration Center initiatives, and Chesapeake Bay activities. He joined NOAA Fisheries in 1993. From 2003 to 2010, he was the Deputy Regional Administrator for the Southeast Region in St. Petersburg, Florida. In 2010, he transferred to NOAA Fisheries Headquarters where he served as the Acting Deputy Director in the Office of Management and Budget and the Acting Deputy Director in the Office of Protected Resources. He began his professional career in 1980 as a fishery scientist at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Mississippi, and later with the Florida Wildlife Research Institute, before joining NOAA. During the past 5 years, he has had responsibility for leading NOAA's diverse missions related to the Gulf of Mexico. In that role, he represented NOAA on the interagency Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, serving as the Deputy Executive Director with the responsibility for the technical and science components of the overall strategy. He led NOAA's Regional Functional Team as part of the agency's tactical response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, where he worked directly with NOAA leadership to coordinate and implement our regional actions in response to the spill. He was the NOAA Regional Collaboration Team Leader since its inception in October 2006, working collaboratively with all NOAA line offices to support integrated, regionally tailored implementation of NOAA-wide programmatic priorities and to provide a more systematic approach to both internal and external communications in the Gulf of Mexico. He led the regional team in building powerful partnerships with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance and with Sea Grant, with a strong focus on habitat conservation and community resiliency engagement. Mr. Sutter graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Rhode Island with an undergraduate degree in Zoology. He received an M.S. in Fisheries Science at the University of Massachusetts. He has published numerous papers and journal articles on fishery science.

Larry TyminskiLarry Tyminski
Chief Information Officer


As Chief Information Officer, one of Mr. Tyminski's principal responsibilities is to ensure alignment with the agency's business and strategic goals by providing oversight and direction of information technology (IT), information infrastructure, and telecommunications programs within headquarters and 12 Regional Science Centers and labs. He is responsible for local- and wide-area network operations, IT strategic planning, and IT security. His duties include the management of a multi-million-dollar IT budget, oversight of a staff of IT professionals, internet and intranet operations, telecommunications management, and project management for various software and hardware projects. He serves as the NOAA Fisheries representative to the Department of Commerce Chief Information Officer (CIO) Council, outside organizations, and other federal agencies for IT initiatives. Prior to joining NOAA Fisheries in 2000, Mr. Tyminski was the Deputy CIO for the Bureau of Economic Analysis. He has held IT management positions with the National Weather Service, Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Raytheon Company, and Sanders Associates (Lockheed). He received his M.B.A. from George Washington University and holds a B.S. from the University of Buffalo.

Donna WietingDonna Wieting
Director, Office of Protected Resources


Ms. Wieting is responsible for the conservation, protection, and recovery of species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) in conjunction with the NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices, Science Centers, and various partners. Ms. Wieting has served in a variety of senior policy and management positions in NOAA over the past 22 years. Starting as a Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in 1989 with NOAA Fisheries, she took increasingly challenging leadership positions within three major organizations at NOAA. These positions involved domestic and international leadership on some of the most challenging issues in environmental management and public policy. Her assignments included 7 years as an environmental policy specialist with NOAA Office of the Chief Scientist; 9 years with the Office of Protected Resources as fishery biologist, Marine Mammal Division Chief, and Deputy Director; and 6 years as Deputy Director and Acting Director of the Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management at the National Ocean Service. Ms. Wieting earned her B.S. in Animal Sciences at the University of Massachusetts and her M.S. in Marine Sciences at Louisiana State University.

James W. Balsiger, Ph.D.James W. Balsiger, Ph.D.
Regional Administrator, Alaska Region


Dr. Balsiger has served as the Regional Administrator for the Alaska Region in Juneau since 2000. He began his career with NOAA in 1977 and has held other leadership roles in NOAA Fisheries during his tenure. From 2008 to 2010, he served as the Acting Assistant Administrator for Fisheries and oversaw the management and conservation of marine fisheries and the protection of marine mammals, sea turtles, and coastal fisheries habitat within the U.S. exclusive economic zone for the entire agency. He was the Regional Science and Research Director at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, where he also served as Deputy Science Director from 1991 through 1995. Prior to that, he was the Program Leader for the Status of Stocks Task within the Center's Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management Division from 1977 to 1991. He holds a B.S. in Forestry from Michigan Technological University, an M.S. in Forest Silviculture from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in Quantitative Ecology and Natural Resource Management from the University of Washington. In 2002, President Bush awarded him a Meritorious Award for sustained superior accomplishments throughout his career.

John K. BullardJohn K. Bullard
Regional Administrator, Greater Atlantic Region


Mr. Bullard assumed the duties of Regional Administrator for the Greater Atlantic Regional Office in 2012. He is responsible for administering NOAA programs for the management of living marine resources from Canada to Cape Hatteras. In this capacity, he directs NOAA Fisheries' programs in support of responsible international and domestic fisheries management in the Greater Atlantic Region. A native of New Bedford, Massachusetts, with a lifelong interest in the ocean, he joined NOAA Fisheries following his retirement at the end of June as the President of the Massachusetts-based Sea Education Association, a non-profit education organization headquartered in Woods Hole that teaches college students and others about the science and culture of the sea. From 1993 to 1998, Mr. Bullard worked for the Clinton Administration in Washington, D.C., where he led NOAA's first federal Office of Sustainable Development and Intergovernmental Affairs. There, he created programs to assist fishing families in New England, the Gulf of Mexico, the Pacific Northwest, and Alaska and around the nation, advised communities on sustainable development, and helped set policy for aquaculture. He also worked on the President's Council on Sustainable Development developing policies to unite the goals of economic opportunity, environmental health, and social equity. Following federal service, he completed a fellowship at Harvard's Institute of Politics. From 1986 to 1992, Mr. Bullard was Mayor of the City of New Bedford, Massachusetts. During his three terms he introduced community policing, recycling, AIDS prevention, and other programs. Mr. Bullard earned his B.A. magna cum laude at Harvard. He received both a Master of Architecture and a Master of City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has lectured widely and received numerous awards, including an Honorary Master of Public Service from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Roy E. Crabtree, Ph.D.Roy E. Crabtree, Ph.D.
Regional Administrator, Southeast Region


Dr. Crabtree has served as Regional Administrator for the Southeast Region since 2003. Previously he served as a senior research scientist at the Florida Marine Research Institute. His managerial experience includes operating his own fishing guide business in the Florida Keys and Everglades National Park, serving as a Fishery Management Specialist with NOAA Fisheries' Southeast Region, and, most recently, serving as Director of the Division of Marine Fisheries with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. With more than 15 years of state and federal service, Dr. Crabtree has gathered broad experience as a natural resource manager. He has authored or co-authored 36 scientific publications and six selected unpublished assessments, and has provided input on numerous fisheries management plans for the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, and Caribbean. He earned his Ph.D. in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary, an M.S. degree in marine science from the University of South Carolina, and a B.S. degree in Biology from Furman University.

Will StelleWill Stelle
Regional Administrator, West Coast Region


Mr. Stelle became the Regional Administrator of the new West Coast Region effective October 1, 2013. In 2010 he was appointed (for the second time) the Northwest Regional Administrator, and had also served in the same capacity in the 1990s, during the first round of listings of pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). During his tenure, the Northwest Region formulated the basic architecture of the ESA salmon program for NOAA Fisheries, partnering with a variety of state and Tribal governments and the private sector. Prior to joining NOAA, Mr. Stelle worked in the White House, for the Secretary of Interior, and served as Chief Counsel for the House Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee, the General Counsel for the Fish and Wildlife Subcommittee, and as staff counsel for the Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs. He graduated from the University of Maine and the University of Washington law schools with a J.D. and LL.M. in marine law, and also studied international marine law at Dalhausie Law School in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Michael D. TosattoMichael D. Tosatto
Regional Administrator, Pacific Islands Region


Mr. Tosatto is the Regional Administrator of the Pacific Islands Region based in Honolulu. Previously he served as the Deputy Regional Administrator for the Pacific Islands Region, providing leadership to manage healthy marine ecosystems that provide for sustainability in marine fishery resources, recover endangered and threatened marine species, and enhance opportunities for commercial, recreational, and cultural marine fisheries activities. Mr. Tosatto served in the U.S. Coast Guard for more than 20 years, including many tours of duty in the Pacific region, where he routinely engaged regional domestic and international partners to carry out living marine resources management and maritime homeland security missions. He is a graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, where he earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering.

Douglas DeMaster, Ph.D.Douglas DeMaster, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Alaska Fisheries Science Center


Dr. DeMaster became Science and Research Director of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in 2001. Previously he served as Director of the National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML), leader of the NMML Cetacean Assessment and Ecology Program, and head of the Marine Mammal Division at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Dr. DeMaster is recognized as one of the leading experts on marine mammal stock assessment and marine mammal-fishery interactions. He has published more than 65 peer-reviewed publications on marine mammals and an additional 38 reports related to the population ecology of marine mammals. In cooperation with other NOAA Fisheries scientists, Dr. DeMaster helped develop the system under which marine mammals are managed in the United States under the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Since receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1978, he has been an active member of the academic community. He was an Adjunct Professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where he taught courses on marine mammal biology and population dynamics. Since 1994, Dr. DeMaster has been an Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington's School of Marine Affairs and more recently the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. He also served as the President of the Society for Marine Mammalogy, the Chair of the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission (IWC), and is currently the deputy Commissioner for the U.S. delegation at the IWC.

William A. Karp, Ph.D.William A. Karp, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Northeast Fisheries Science Center


Dr. Karp was appointed Northeast Science and Research Director in 2012. In this role, he plans, develops, and manages a multidisciplinary program of basic and applied research on the living marine resources of the Northeast Continental Shelf Ecosystem from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. He also leads NOAA Fisheries' six northeastern labs and field stations located from Maine to Washington, D.C. Previously, he served as the Deputy Science and Research Director for the Alaska Fisheries Center for four years. In that position, Dr. Karp provided the services of chief operating officer for the Center, guiding program planning and development, workforce development, administration, fiscal management, facilities oversight, IT systems oversight, and safety and environmental compliance actions. He is a member of the International Council for Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Science Committee and chairs the ICES Steering Group on Ecosystem Surveys, Science and Technology. His scientific expertise includes fisheries acoustics, survey design and innovation, bycatch assessment and management, and fishery-dependent data collection and interpretation. He has served as lead for the Center's cooperative agreement with the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research and is a Senior Fellow of the Council for Excellence in Government. Dr. Karp was awarded a B.S. degree in Applied Biology by Liverpool John Moores University (U.K.), and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Fisheries by the University of Washington.

Bonnie Ponwith, Ph.D.Bonnie Ponwith, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Southeast Fisheries Science Center


Dr. Ponwith is the Science and Research Director for the Southeast Fisheries Science Center. She previously served as the Deputy Director of NOAA Fisheries Service's Office of Science and Technology. Before coming to NOAA in 1998, she worked for nearly a decade with Washington Department of Fisheries, working on salmon and groundfish monitoring and management, and three years with American Samoa's Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources conducting research, monitoring, and management for fisheries, protected resources, and coral reef ecosystems. Dr. Ponwith earned a B.S. in Environmental Science from the Florida Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in Fisheries Science from Texas A&M University.

Samuel Pooley, Ph.D.Samuel Pooley, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center


Dr. Pooley is Science and Research Director of the Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center. For the past 20 years he has served as the Honolulu laboratory's lead economist, with responsibilities ranging from economic analysis of commercial fisheries to evaluation of the benefits of recreational fisheries and endangered species preservation. He has also published papers on bio-economic analysis and alternative fishery management and property rights regimes, including cooperative and corporate management. Dr. Pooley received his doctorate in Political Science from the University of Hawaii and an M.S. degree in Economics from the University of Birmingham (U.K.).

John E. Stein, Ph.D.John E. Stein, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Northwest Fisheries Science Center


Dr. Stein is the Science and Research Director of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. He is involved in implementing NOAA's National Ocean Policy efforts, serving as the Federal Co-Lead for the West Coast's Regional Planning Body for Marine Planning. He is also the co-lead for NOAA's West Coast Regional Team and serves on the Executive Committee for the West Coast Governors Alliance on Ocean Health and chairs the Science Panel for the Puget Sound Partnership. He recently served as the Chair of the Science Board of the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) and is now the U.S. Delegate to PICES; a multinational organization of Pacific Rim countries. As a part of NOAA's response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, Dr. Stein served as manager of NOAA's Seafood Safety Program. Dr. Stein holds Affiliate Professor positions at the University of Washington in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Throughout his 33-year science career in NOAA Fisheries, Dr. Stein focused on impacts of anthropogenic and natural toxic compounds (e.g., chemical contaminants and marine biotoxins) on fishery resources and protected marine species, the development and application of biological markers of chemical contaminant exposure and effects in fishes and marine mammals, and the application of these techniques in delineating relationships between chemical contaminant exposure and effects in fishes and marine mammals. In addition, Dr. Stein advises NOAA's efforts to research and manage the effects of the ocean on the health of humans, health benefits and disease risk, and is also a member of a NOAA team that developed a science plan on ocean acidification. Dr. Stein received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Washington in 1980.

Francisco (Cisco) Werner, Ph.D.Francisco (Cisco) Werner, Ph.D.
Science and Research Director, Southwest Fisheries Science Center


Dr. Werner became the Science and Research Director for NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center in 2011. Previously he was the Director of the Institute of Marine and Coastal Studies at Rutgers University. His research has included the study of the structure and function of marine ecosystems, ocean circulation physics, and the development and implementation of ocean and coastal observing and forecasting systems. He has also researched the development of physical and biological models for marine ecosystems in the Northwest Atlantic, the U.S. South Atlantic Bight, and the North Pacific. Dr. Werner has co-authored more than 90 refereed publications and collaborated with many future colleagues at NOAA on important programs, including the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Program, Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem Organization, Integrated Ocean Observing System, and various projects related to climate change and fisheries. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Washington.