SALTONSTALL KENNEDY GRANT PROGRAM
Harmful Algal Blooms and Their Impacts on....
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GRANT NUMBER:  NA66FD0113               NMFS NUMBER:  95-NWR-002

REPORT TITLE:  Harmful Algal Blooms and Their Impacts on Shellfish and Finfish in Western Washington

AUTHOR:

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AVAILABLE FROM:  National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, Northwest Region, 7600 Sand Point Way, NE, BIN C15700, Bldg. 1, Seattle, WA 98115.   PHONE: (206) 526-6115

ABSTRACT

The objectives of this project were to learn more about organisms that produce domoic acid, determine environmental conditions that control blooms of Alexandrium catenella, continue monitoring the seasonal and regional distributions of all likely harmful algal species, and maintain the phytoplankton network of growers and university, state, and federal personnel.  Results from the field studies identified at least six species of Pseudo-nitzschia that are potential domoic acid producers.  They occur on coast beaches in the May-through-October period.  In Puget Sound/Hood Canal, Pseudo-nitzschia are present during all months but are most abundant from April to October.  The researchers concluded that physical oceanography plays a large part in the distribution of the species, but the researchers were unable to determine how cells/toxins reach razor clams on coastal beaches.  Alexandrium species occurred infrequently in the coast samples but were commonly found in samples taken during the May-September period in Manchester, Allyn, and Quartermaster Harbor.  Researchers determined that spring/neap tidal cycle may be a major factor influencing timing, duration, and peak concentrations of Alexandrium in Quartermaster Harbor.  Researchers maintained contact with the phytoplankton network, and information is exchanged when potential harmful algal species are found.

 
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