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Technology Development for Flavor Production....
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GRANT NUMBER:  NA76FD0142           NMFS NUMBER:  96-NER-127

REPORT TITLE:  Technology Development for Flavor Production from Seafood Processing Wastes

AUTHOR:  Chong M. Lee

PUBLISH DATE:  July 10, 2000

AVAILABLE FROM:  National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Region, One Blackburn Drive, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930.  TELEPHONE:   (978) 281-9267

ABSTRACT

Fish and shellfish processing wastes constitutes two thirds of incoming raw materials. Frame waste from red hake (Urophycis chuss) (underutilized white, lean fish), the lobster bodies left after collecting claws and tails, and sea clam (Spisula solidissima) bellies from clam processing were used as commercially important processing wastes in the Northeast region. The objective of this study was to develop an enzyme-assisted seafood flavor manufacturing process which enables U.S. manufacturers to produce specialty flavor stocks of high quality from seafood processing wastes. The general process that was developed consists of separation of usable meat, proteolytic hydrolysis to liberate flavor-giving free amino acids, enzyme inactivation, maturation, filtering, and concentration or dehydration. A flavor production optimization was achieved by evaluating various process variables including the enzyme system, the hydrolysis condition, the degree of hydrolysis, the homogenate-water ratio, the flavor quality, and yield. The industry panel rated products good to very good and suggested that high quality natural fish and lobster flavors can be locally produced from the processing wastes using the developed processes if the raw materials are available in volume at an acceptable cost. The same process can be readily applicable to other available species such as crab, shrimp and underutilized fish species for seafood flavor production. Based on the pilot plant production trial, a production scale-up can be easily achievable using a simple steam injection vessel allows a good temperature control of water as heating medium.

Fish and shellfish processing wastes constitute two-thirds of incoming raw materials. Frame waste from red hake (Urophycis chuss), the lobster bodies left after collecting claws and tails, and sea clam (Spisula solidissima) bellies from clam processing are commercially important processing wastes in the Northeast region. The objective of this study was to develop an enzyme-assisted seafood flavor manufacturing process that enables U.S. manufacturers to produce specialty-flavor stocks of high quality from seafood processing wastes. The general process developed consisted of separation of usable meat, proteolytic hydrolysis to liberate flavor-giving free amino acids, enzyme inactivation, maturation, filtering, and concentration or dehydration. Flavor-production optimization was achieved by evaluating various process variables including the enzyme system, the hydrolysis condition, the degree of hydrolysis, the homogenate–water ratio, the flavor quality, and yield. The industry panel rated products "good" to "very good" and suggested that high-quality natural fish and lobster flavors can be locally produced from processing wastes using the developed processes if the raw materials are available in volume at an acceptable cost. This process can be readily applied to other available species such as crab, shrimp, and underutilized fish species for seafood flavor production. Based on the pilot plant production trial, a production scale-up can be easily achieved using a simple steam injection vessel that allows good temperature control of water as heating medium.

 
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