SALTONSTALL KENNEDY GRANT PROGRAM
The Recovery of Non-Fillet Flesh from Frames....
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GRANT NUMBER: NA90AAHSK165           NMFS NUMBER:  89-AKR-010B

REPORT TITLE: The Recovery of Non-Fillet Flesh from Frames and Bone and Parasite Removal Technology Development

AUTHOR:  Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation

PUBLISH DATE:  May 1, 1995

AVAILABLE FROM:  National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Region, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802.  PHONE: (907) 586-7224

ABSTRACT

Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation continued efforts to fully utilize Alaska's groundfish resources. Two tasks were incorporated into the project: The first was the investigation of the use of groundfish frames to produce a high quality protein raw material for the food industry; and secondly to complete an ongoing project to develop a machine vision system to detect groundfish bones and parasites during the manufacture of fillets.  The objective of this project was to continue research to recover additional usable fish flesh from filleted groundfish carcasses, and develop and test improved techniques for detecting bones and parasites in groundfish fillets. A system was to be developed and tested which can segregate defective product while allowing defect-free product to pass without being handled. The non-fillet flesh recovery portion of the project was successful and resulted in the sale of some non-fillet flesh volumes which would have gone directly to the waste stream. The raw material extraction was successful and both yields and quality were improved during the course of the project. The bone and parasite removal portion of the project was not successful from the standpoint of answering industry problems. The new detection technique continues to show promise on a research level and the process has been patented by the University of Alaska Fairbanks.   During the by-product utilization portion of the project, primary production of mince from frames was completed with evaluations of the product conducted by a laboratory and various customers.  Three secondary products were developed and evaluated through a focus group. One final product was test marketed within-store demonstrations and fully developed point-of-sale material.  Increased recovery in Alaska groundfish processing is feasible through the use of frame mince. For high volume groundfish processors this increased recovery seems to be sound from an economic perspective.

 
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