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NOAA predicts above-average season for commercial harvest of brown shrimp in western Gulf of Mexico

Contact:
Allison  Garrett
(727) 551-5750
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
July 5, 2012

    The harvest of brown shrimp in the western Gulf of Mexico is expected to be 59.2 million
pounds, which is above the historical 50-year average of 56.5 million pounds, according to
NOAA’s annual forecast. The prediction covers the period from July 2012 through June 2013 for
state and federal waters off Louisiana and federal waters off Texas.

    NOAA scientists make the annual prediction of brown shrimp catches based on
monitoring of juvenile brown shrimp abundance, growth estimates and environmental indicators.
They predict shrimp catches for state and federal waters off Louisiana from west of the
Mississippi River to the Texas-Louisiana border to be approximately 31.8 million pounds this
season. The Texas portion of the catch is predicted to be 27.4 million pounds.

    Most of the shrimp harvested in the U.S. – 68 percent – comes from the Gulf of Mexico,
especially Texas and Louisiana. Total domestic shrimp harvest brought in $414 million in 2010,
the latest figures available.

    "Brown shrimp are important to the economy of Gulf coast communities," said Roger
Zimmerman, Ph.D., director for NOAA Fisheries Southeast Fisheries Science Center’s
Galveston Laboratory. "They are popular among seafood consumers and are used as bait by
recreational anglers, so hopefully we’ll see plenty of brown shrimp available in seafood markets
and local bait shops this year."

    Young brown shrimp begin entering estuaries in Texas and western Louisiana in mid-
February and continue through July, depending on environmental conditions. This year, three
environmental indicators – warm air temperatures, more saline water in marshes, and strong
southerly winds that sustain tidal height – increased favorable nursery area, thus allowing for
greater distribution of juvenile brown shrimp within estuaries.

    Juvenile brown shrimp abundance and growth estimates are obtained by monitoring the
inshore commercial shrimp fisheries in Texas and the inshore and nearshore fisheries in
Louisiana. Data for these forecasts are obtained from NOAA Fisheries Galveston Laboratory,
NOAA port agents, NOAA’s National Climatic Data and Weather centers, Louisiana Department
of Wildlife and Fisheries, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and the commercial shrimp
industry.

    NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from
the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and
marine resources. Join us on FacebookTwitter and our other social media channels.


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