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Dive into NOAA Fisheries Whale Week

February 13-17, 2017
#WhaleWeek

The largest and oldest mammals on Earth, whales are found in every ocean of the world. Their songs can travel farther than any other mammal. 

Twenty-nine species of whales live in U.S. waters. All of these species are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). Endangered and threatened marine mammals are also protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA)

NOAA Fisheries works in collaboration with our regional Offices, science centers, and partners to develop and implement a variety of programs for the protection, conservation, and recovery of these species under the MMPA.

Learn more about whales by checking out the features below. Watch the video on the right for more information about threats that whales face and the ways we are working to protect these truly wondrous creatures.
 

Whale Week 2017 Leadership Message

Whales are beautiful and magnificent creatures that inspire awe in all of us. NOAA Fisheries and partners are celebrating Whale Week 2017—there is a lot to learn about the new ways our scientists are studying whales, what they are learning, and how we can all pitch in to help protect whales.

#WhaleWeek Reddit AUA Chat: The Rising Risk of Whale Entanglement

On February 17, NOAA scientists Jamison Smith and Ed Lyman will take your questions on reddit about discuss whale disentanglement and what NOAA and our  partners are doing to reduce risks and rescue whales in distress. Watch a video on how to report entangled humpback whales in the Hawaiian Islands region.

Sperm Whales: Revealing the Mysteries of the Deep

Sperm whales are a remarkable species found from the equator to the poles. These whales are large, noisy, and often social. Learn four reasons sperm whales are special. 

Bryde's Whale: The Expert Is In

There are likely less than 100 Bryde’s whales living in the Gulf of Mexico. This whale is the only year-round resident baleen whale living there.  A baleen whale has no teeth and uses baleen plates in their mouth to filter out small prey  from seawater.
10 Wonderful Facts about Whales

How much do you know about different species of whales? Check out these facts to see if you can learn something you didn't know about whales!
False Killer Whales: Sentinels of Ocean Health

A small population of endangered false killer whales is receiving special attention in the Hawaiian Islands. Scientists are gaining valuable information about their lives thanks to recovery grants from NOAA Fisheries.