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NOAA Fisheries Celebrates National Seafood Month

October 1, 2017

October is National Seafood Month

Join us all month long as we celebrate the bounty of sustainable seafood! From finfish to shellfish, Americans love seafood—and it's easy to see why. This healthy food choice provides key nutrients and proteins for children and adults. The seafood caught and farmed in the United States comes from some of the most sustainably managed fisheries in the world.

A Global Leader in Sustainability

The United States is recognized as a global leader in sustainable seafood thanks to a rigorous science-based fisheries management process. This process is enforced under ten national standards of sustainability through the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act—exceeding the international standards for ecolabeling of seafood.

Our Fisheries Management Process 

NOAA Fisheries tracks 474 fish stocks managed under 46 fishery management plans. We have rebuilt 43 stocks since 2000 as a result of our fishery management process. Overfishing and overfished numbers remained near all-time lows in 2016. To learn more about seafood, check out FishWatch.gov—the nation's database on sustainable seafood—providing science-based facts on more than 100 marine species.

Cooking Kelp with Ocean Farmer Bren Smith

Ocean farmer Bren Smith demonstrates an easy way to make a delicious dish featuring kelp noodles. Smith’s kelp farm, Thimble Island Ocean Farm, is located on 20 acres near the town of Branford, Connecticut. Watch this video to learn more.

Blue CatfishInvasive but Tasty!

Since people first moved blue catfish into some Chesapeake Bay rivers decades ago, these fish—which come from rivers in the middle of the United States—have dramatically increased in number. But blue catfish are voracious eaters, and they have few natural predators. Lucky for us humans, they are also pretty tasty! Blue catfish in Chesapeake Bay tributaries are now caught and sold commercially. Learn more about blue catfish.

Oyster Bar 101

With oyster aquaculture production on the rise in many regions of the United States, more and more people are finding themselves at oyster bars. Also known as a raw bar, these establishments offer guests a variety of different types of oysters as well as the experience of eating in a more hands-on way. Whether you are looking to impress a date or just avoid spilling cocktail sauce on your shirt, here is some advice for oyster bar beginners.

Seafood Month 2017 Leadership Message

Chris Oliver highlights seafood and all of the people who help make our country a global leader in sustainability. Read his latest leadership message.

Try Tasty Seafood Recipes from FishWatch.gov

If you're looking for information on popular fish species and tasty recipes to try in the kitchen, look no further than FishWatch.gov. Check out these seafood recipes

Now Serving: Seafood Sound Bites

What does the term "sustainable fisheries" mean and why should it be important to you when buying 
fish? How do you know if your fish is sustainably caught? Watch this collection of short videos.

U.S. Aquaculture by the Numbers

Aquaculture—also known as fish or shellfish farming—supplies half the seafood eaten in the United States and abroad. Take a closer look at U.S. aquaculture by the numbers in the short video to the right. Learn more about aquaculture.

Oyster Restoration in Southern California

A forum earlier this year brought together experts to discuss how best to restore a missing piece of Southern California’s coastal ecosystem: Olympia oysters. Long identified with the Pacific Northwest, they were once a vital fixture in estuaries, bays, and sounds along the entire West Coast from British Columbia to Mexico. Learn more about oyster restoration in Southern California.

Aquaculture Week 2017

We started Seafood Month a little early with a celebration of aquaculture—also known as fish or shellfish farming—which supplies half the seafood eaten in the United States and abroad. Learn more about aquaculture.

More Seafood Features

Craving more information on our work to ensure sustainable seafood? See more seafood stories and watch these videos.