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Science and Technology

  • New Deep-Sea Coral Report Released - Apr 23: NOAA Fisheries announces the release of the 2014 Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program Report to Congress, featuring the exciting discovery of deep-sea coral habitats and progress made in our regional research.
  • Fisheries Economist Receives Presidential Award - Apr 15: Alan Haynie is being recognized for his innovative work to ensure that fishery rules promote sustainable fishing.
  • Researching Ecosystem Effects on Fish Populations - Apr 9: Scientists seek to understand how physical and biological forces combine to drive fish productivity in the Gulf of Alaska.
  • 25 Years of Fisheries Research Since Exxon Valdez - Mar 24: Twenty-five years ago, relatively little was known about how oil spills affect fish populations. Today, scientists understand that the impacts can be more widespread and long-lasting than previously imagined.
  • Crude Oil Causes Defects in Large Marine Fish - Mar 24: Crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico causes severe defects in the developing hearts of bluefin and yellowfin tuna, according to a new study by a team of NOAA and academic scientists.
  • NOAA Fisheries Science Program Review - Mar 14: We continually strive to advance the science informing fisheries and protected resources management, which includes a systematic review process of our science centers and headquarters Office of Science & Tech.
  • Protecting Threatened Ice Seals - Mar 13: How do NOAA Fisheries scientists protect threatened ice seals? Watch our video to learn the science behind their protection.
  • Sound Science and Climate Change - Mar 11: As our climate changes, we must base our policies in sound science. Read what our chief scientist for NOAA Fisheries, Richard Merrick, has to say about the importance of sound science.
  • Climate, Fisheries, and Protected Resources - Mar 11: NOAA Fisheries scientists are working to understand the effects of climate change and ocean acidification. Learn more about some of the things we are studying.
  • Fish Stock Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Mar 4: NOAA Fisheries has developed the first methodology of its kind to rapidly assess the vulnerability of U.S. marine fish stocks to changing climate and ocean conditions.
  • New Process to Help Prioritize Stock Assessments - Feb 20: NOAA Fisheries has prepared a system to help enhance the transparency and standardization with which each science center and fishery management council prioritizes fish stock assessments.
  • A Changing Climate in Fisheries Management - Feb 14: How will we manage fish populations as they move in response to climate change? NOAA Fisheries biologist John Manderson is working on one small piece of the puzzle.
  • NOAA Fisheries Publishes Bycatch Report Update - Feb 7: The U.S. National Bycatch Report First Edition Update 1 provides a national compilation of bycatch estimates for living marine resources (fish, marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, invertebrates) of the U.S. at the fishery and species level.
  • Tagged Bluefin Tuna Recaptured After Sixteen Years - Jan 22: By tagging fish for NOAA’s Cooperative Tagging Program, fishermen have contributed greatly to our scientific understanding of many valuable species.
  • The Abundant—But Not So Tasty—Giant Grenadier - Jan 13: If giant grenadier were tasty, you’d likely find it on the menu at your favorite seafood restaurant. Instead, find out what scientists are learning about this prolific, albeit not so tasty, deep-water fish.
  • Long Live the King - Jan 7: To ensure a sustainable fishery, scientists are studying how red king crabs respond to a changing environment.
  • NOAA Dedicates Daniel K. Inouye Regional Center - Dec 17: On December 16, NOAA held a dedication ceremony to unveil the Daniel K. Inouye Regional Center located on Ford Island in Honolulu.
  • A Changing Climate for Endangered Species - Dec 4: Scientists are working to ensure that the Endangered Species Act remains effective in the face of a changing climate. A special section in the latest issue of Conservation Biology highlights their progress.
  • Scientists on the Hunt for Sturgeon Spawning Areas - Nov 20: Sturgeon are spawning again in the Chesapeake Bay, but they’ve been gone so long that we’ve forgotten the basic life history information we need to boost their recovery. That’s about to change.
  • NOAA Social Scientists Dig into Sandy's Effects - Nov 20: NOAA social scientists dig into Sandy's long term effects on coastal fishing communities.
  • Our Annual Statistical Yearbook for U.S. Fisheries - Oct 30: Today, NOAA Fisheries releases Fisheries of the U.S., 2012. Continuing our rich scientific tradition, this is a statistical yearbook filled with facts and figures about our domestic fisheries.
  • A Smart Strategy for Protecting Top Predators - Oct 30: Learn more about a new study that may help conservation and development co-exist in the ocean.
  • NOAA Fisheries Announces New West Coast Region - Oct 21: NOAA Fisheries announces new West Coast Region—Northwest Region and Southwest Region unite to protect marine resources West Coast-wide.
  • Behind the Scenes: A Fisheries Research Expedition - Oct 18: NOAA scientists conduct fish surveys all along U.S. coasts. The data from these surveys are used to set sustainable catch limits, ensuring we can enjoy a healthy supply of seafood now and in the future. Get a first hand look at a fish survey.
  • Two Takes on Climate Change in the Ocean - Sept 30: A pair of recent studies show how marine ecosystems are changing as ocean temperatures rise, and that the changes are happening more quickly than expected.
  • Meet Our Senior Science Advisors - Sept 26: Advanced science and technology is fundamental to NOAA Fisheries’ mission to protect our nation’s living marine resources. Meet our senior science advisors.
  • NOAA Expert Honored for Stock Assessment Work - Sept 26: The American Fisheries Society honored Richard D. Methot Jr., Ph.D. with the 2013 Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award, an award for outstanding contributions to the conservation of fishery resources.
  • Whales and Dolphins in a Noisy Ocean - Sept 4: Many marine mammals use hearing to find their way through the world. But parts of the ocean are filling up with man-made noise, and that has the potential to leave them partially blinded. The CETSOUND project might help.
  • An Early Warning System for Ocean Tipping Points - Sept 3: A team of scientists and other experts is investigating the mechanics of ocean tipping points. That should help us to avoid tipping points—or to recover once they’ve been crossed.
  • Studying Influences on Gulf of Alaska Marine Life - Sept 3: The Gulf of Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Research Project is a five year study engaging oceanographers, fisheries biologists, and modelers who examine factors that influence five commercially important groundfishes.
  • The Tech Tank—A New Ocean Sensing System - Aug 27: Learn more about the new Ocean Technology Development Test Tank, one of the highlights of NOAA's recently opened Southwest Fisheries Science Center.
  • New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts - Aug 27: According to the 2013 National Climate Assessment, the nation’s valuable ocean ecosystems and marine resources are already being impacted by a changing climate.
  • NOAA Fisheries Opens New La Jolla Laboratory - Aug 26: NOAA Fisheries opens its new La Jolla Laboratory, its most technologically-advanced and environmentally friendly marine science research facility in the United States, on August 27th. Credit: Vern Elmore.
  • Scientists, Fishermen Unite to Record Shark Data - Aug 9: NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center began collecting data from shark recreational tournaments in 1961. Since then, this has helped scientists work with local fisherman to combine recreational fishing with important shark research.
  • Shattering Shark Myths - Aug 8: Can you tell shark myth from fact? Better check this list out.
  • Missed the #SharkWeekChat? Read Our Recap - Aug 9: Did you miss the #SharkWeekChat with our 2 shark experts? Get caught up.
  • The Science Behind: A Shortfin Mako's Last Meal - Aug 6: Peer into a shark's stomach along with a NOAA Fisheries scientist and see what was on the menu for its last meal.
  • The Science Behind: Ageing a Shark - Aug 6: What does ageing the backbone of a shark entail? Catch NOAA Fisheries shark scientist Lisa Natanson in action.
  • U.S. Leads the Way in Shark Conservation - Aug 3: A closer look at NOAA's role in shark conservation, management, and policy.
  • Keeping an Eye on Arctic Marine Mammals - Jul 28: NOAA scientists kicked off their annual Aerial Surveys of Arctic Marine Mammals project this month, thanks to funding by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).
  • Uncovering the Mysteries of Nautilus - Jul 22: NOAA-funded research is better helping us understand nautilus; a mysterious creature that has been around for half a billion years.
  • Crabs in the Lab - Jul 17: Located on Near Island in Kodiak, Alaska, the Kodiak Fisheries Research Center is often referred to as the “top crab lab in the country,” and is the primary facility for the AFSC’s Shellfish Assessment Program.
  • Shark Conservation in the U.S. and Abroad - Jul 15: A closer look at how NOAA Fisheries is leading the way in the conservation and management of shark populations domestically and internationally.
  • The Journey of Atlantic Salmon - Jul 15: International research turns the spotlight on the ocean and its importance to the recovery and management of Atlantic salmon.
  • The Science Behind Killer Whale Genetics - Jul 11: Found in every ocean around the world, killer whales are a force to be reckoned with. Learn what NOAA scientists and researchers are discovering about killer whale genetics.
  • The Case of the Dead Dolphin - Jul 9: When a NOAA marine biologist performs a necropsy on a dolphin that washed up dead on the beach, she’s not only monitoring the health of marine mammals. She’s monitoring human health as well.
  • NOAA Teachers at Sea Talk Fisheries Science - Jun 27: Teachers At Sea are a unique component to at-sea research—they participate in the long shifts and odd hours of data collection and bring an educator’s perspective to the endeavor.
  • Working Together for a Sustainable Crab Fishery - Jun 25: The Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program funds research on solutions to bycatch-related problems. Learn more about ongoing research in Oregon's Dungeness crab fishery.
  • Learn the “ABCs of Stock Assessment” - Jun 24: Watch our new sketch animation video, which tackles the often-misunderstood topic of stock assessments. Learn more about how we balance data and uncertainty in our approach to stock assessments.
  • Changing Sea Temps Affect Young Cod Food Supply - Jun 20: Changing sea water temperatures and circulation patterns have profoundly affected key Northeast zooplankton species in recent decades, and may be influencing the recovery of Atlantic cod and other fish stocks in the region.
  • Turtles Have Fingerprints? - Jun 14: New genetic technique with turtles reveals paternity and more.
  • First-Ever Seal Tagging Study Underway - Jun 12: It was a day of fur and firsts for gray seal identification during the new electronic tagging study on Cape Cod.
  • U.S. and Russia Complete Largest Ice Seal Survey - Jun 13: Researchers from U.S. and Russia completed the largest survey ever for seals that live in sea-ice habitat.
  • There's a Shortfin Mako Shark App for That - Jun 13: Mobile technology helps track the catch and release of sharks. Now available for iPhone and iPad, NOAA Fisheries’ Release Mako app lets you report live releases of Atlantic shortfin mako sharks while you’re still out on the water.
  • Keeping An Eye On Pollock - Jun 10: Scientists and fishermen work together to understand how walleye pollock respond to a changing environment. This photo shows Dutch Harbor, Alaska, home to the Bering Sea walleye pollock fleet. Credit: NOAA
  • Our Science at Sea - Jun 5: Our data comes from many sources, but two critical sources of fishery-dependent data are observers and electronic monitoring. Take a look at our science at sea.
  • A Fisheries Observer with a Passion for Her Work - Jun 5: Fisheries observers, like fishermen, work hard at a job they believe in—making sure the nation’s seafood supply is sustainable.
  • The Keratin Connection - May 16: Experts with very different backgrounds join forces to protect endangered sea turtles.
  • Report to Congress on the Status of U.S. Fisheries - May 2: In 2012, six stocks were declared rebuilt and the number of stocks on the overfishing list was at an all-time low.
  • Leading by Success—A Message on Status of Stocks - May 2: This month we turn the spotlight onto the continued success of the U.S. science-based fisheries management system established under the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA).
  • Northeast Sea Surface Temps Reach Record High - Apr 29: During 2012, sea surface temperatures in the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem were the highest recorded in 150 years, according to the latest Ecosystem Advisory issued by NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center.
  • How NOAA Observes Our Changing Earth - Apr 22: NOAA uses a variety of observational resources to gain more information about our evolving planet, including satellites, ships, planes, buoys, and on-the-ground scientists to provide data to better understand, and ultimately preserve, our earth.
  • New "Fishways" Lead to Astounding Herring Increase - Apr 11: Since the 2007 installation of two fishways on Massachusetts' Acushnet River, scientists have observed an astounding 1,140 percent increase in the number of migrating herring able to access prime spawning grounds.
  • NOAA Releases Recreational Fishing Report for 2012 - Apr 2: Recreational fishing is part of our nation's history, and we continue to improve upon this great tradition. A new report, "Recreational Fishing Year in Review" highlights accomplishments and goals for U.S. recreational fishing.
  • Technology Helps Fight Fraud—It’s No Joke - Apr 1: Learn how new traceability technology may help fight seafood fraud.
  • Study Analyzes Risks to Whales from Ship Traffic - Mar 29: Researchers identified areas off southern California with high numbers of whales and assessed their risk from potentially deadly collisions with commercial ship traffic in a newly released study.
  • Integrated Pelagic Survey Completed in Northeast - Mar 26: Researchers have completed the first comprehensive survey of the upper waters of the continental shelf off of the Northeast U.S. from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to the Nova Scotia Shelf, including Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine.
  • Scientists Use Acoustic Technology to Study Cod - Mar 25: For the first time, NOAA researchers and colleagues report using acoustic monitoring technology to record spawning cod in the wild.
  • NOAA Scientists Focus Research on Skate Nurseries - Mar 11: NOAA scientists will be keeping a closer eye on six skate nursery sites in the Bering Sea, following final action by members of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council at the February meeting in Portland, Oregon.
  • Fisheries Economics Report Released - Mar 7: U.S. commercial and recreational fishing supported 1.7 million full and part-time jobs in fishing across the broader economy in 2011, and generated $199 billion in sales impacts and contributed $88 billion to Gross Domestic Product.
  • Scientists Launch a New Era in Whale Research - Mar 7: New technology enables safe, non-invasive methods for monitoring the health and physiology of large whales.
  • New Marine Fishery Allocation Report Posted - Jan 29: A new report commissioned by NOAA Fisheries, Marine Fishery Allocation Issues, has been posted online. A national stakeholder call is planned.
  • When One Endangered Species Eats Another - Jan 22: When one endangered species eats another, ecosystem-based management may be the only way to save them both: killer whales and chinook salmon.
  • Scientists Link Climate Change and Gray Snapper - Jan 8: NOAA scientists recently developed projections of gray snapper distribution under several climate change scenarios as they work to understand the effect of climate change on marine fisheries along the U.S. east coast.
  • Teachers Go High-Tech with Underwater Technology - Dec 17: What kind of underwater technologies did NOAA Teachers At Sea Alicia Gillean and Allan Phipps use when they were on research cruises this past summer?
  • Fishery Data, On the Double - Nov 26: Collaboration between NOAA and the fishing industry allows for more efficient and accurate data collection in two valuable Pacific fisheries—hake and sardine.
  • Advancing Designs for Innovative Fish Passage - Nov 27: To facilitate fish passage in Washington's Baker River, NOAA Fisheries engineers worked closely with Puget Sound Energy to design an innovative fish passage system.
  • Listening for Change in the Arctic - Oct 31: New developments in acoustic technology mean that scientists can use sound to closely monitor changes in the marine ecosystem.
  • Making Sense of Fish Stock Assessment Models - Oct 10: How do we make sure our nation's fisheries are sustainable and productive? It starts with fish stock assessment modeling—combining data to evaluate fish stock health necessary to inform fisheries management decisions.
  • Ecosystem Factors and Assessments -
  • Aerial Drones Give Scientists a New Perspective - Oct 3: What will help launch a whole new era of marine mammal research? Aerial drones help biologist Wayne Perryman and other NOAA scientists study animals and ecosystems in a whole new way.
  • Getting to the Bottom of Marine Mammal Crimes - Oct 3: Special agents and enforcement officers with NOAA Fisheries Office of Law Enforcement investigate crimes against marine mammals under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this month.
  • Coral "Hotspots" Discovered Off Northeast Coast - Oct 1: NOAA researchers explored deepwater canyons off the northeastern U.S. in search of deep-sea corals and sponges and found coral “hotspots” that likely serve as important habitat for a variety of fish species and other marine life.
  • Ocean Acidification: A Scientist's Perspective - Sept 26: How does more acidic seawater threaten the health of our oceans and the economics of our coastal communities? Learn more about the impacts of ocean acidification from a NOAA scientist.
  • New Research: Climate Impacts on Marine Predators - Sept 24: What happens when marine animals at the top of the food chain start to feel the impacts of climate change? This week Nature Climate Change features the results of research led by NOAA Fisheries scientist Elliott Hazen.
  • Statistical Report Card for U.S. Fisheries Posted - Sept 19: Wondering about the state of U.S. fisheries? NOAA Fisheries' annual report gives you the breakdown.
  • Leadership Highlights U.S. Fisheries Statistics - Sept 19: NOAA Fisheries posts a statistical yearbook, Fisheries of the U.S., 2011, filled with facts and figures about our domestic fisheries from 2011.
  • NOAA Finds Record Highs in Sea Surface Temperature - Sept 18: NOAA reports sea surface temperatures along the Northeast Continental Shelf were the highest ever recorded during the first six months of 2012.
  • Funding Innovative Research to Reduce Bycatch - Aug 29: Through the Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program, NOAA Fisheries provides funds critical to key researchers and fishermen for the research and development of innovative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch.
  • Bering Sea Skates Are Key To Alaska's Ecosystems - Aug 28: NOAA scientists propose six areas in the eastern Bering Sea as habitat areas of particular concern (HAPCs) for skates. Skates are important indicators of the health of Alaska's ecosystems.
  • Aquaculture Techniques Help Conserve White Abalone - Aug 27: A captive breeding program for endangered white abalone uses aquaculture techniques to establish a self-sustaining white abalone population in the wild.
  • New Survey Tool Shows Juvenile Scallop Abundance - Aug 24: NOAA researchers have seen high numbers of young sea scallops in Mid-Atlantic using the newest version of the HabCam, dubbed "the Seahorse" for its spiny profile. The tool gives a comprehensive view of the ocean floor.
  • Understanding the Elusive Giant Pacific Octopus - Aug 17: Just when you thought it was going to be another shark, we'll throw you an octopus. At NOAA Fisheries, every week isn't just Shark Week, it's also Octopus Week.
  • Twitter #SharkChat @NOAALive with Shark Scientist - Aug 16: NOAA shark scientist Trey Driggers will answer questions live on Twitter this Thursday, August 16, at 2:00 p.m. Eastern. Trey conducts research on all kinds of sharks.
  • Circle Hooks: The Preferred Thresher Catcher? - Aug 15: NOAA scientists, anglers, and other institutions observe how thresher sharks are caught and released in Southern California—the key to long term conservation of the common thresher shark.
  • Sawfish—Cousins of the Shark - Aug 15: Sawfish have skeletons made of cartilage and shark-like bodies and gills. But during the past decade, these creatures have faced dramatic decline due to habitat loss and capture in fisheries.
  • Shark Conservation in Our Global Oceans - Aug 14: Through international cooperation and state-of-the art technology, NOAA Fisheries is conducting joint research with Uruguay’s fisheries agency that is critical to inform international conservation and management decisions for pelagic sharks.
  • Shark Mythbusters - Aug 13: Can you tell shark myth from fact? Better check this list out.
  • Dive into the Deep End of Shark Conservation - Aug 13: A closer look at how NOAA Fisheries works to conserve and manage shark populations domestically and internationally.
  • Shark Feature Stories - Aug 13: Can you tell shark myth from fact? Better check this list out.
  • Shark Tales—Adventures With A Shark Scientist - Aug 9: Ever wonder what it's like to study sharks for a living? NOAA Fisheries shark scientist Trey Driggers gives us details about his work.
  • Successful Tag Recovery from Huge Bluefin Tuna - Aug 8: NOAA scientists tagged an 8-foot, 400-pound bluefin tuna off the coast of Florida and retrieved the drifting tag at sea south of New York three months later. The data on this tag will provide rich details from the high seas adventures of one big tuna.
  • New Technology Helps Predict Harmful Algal Blooms - Aug 8: NOAA scientists use advanced technology to predict harmful algal blooms and provide warnings to aquaculture and other businesses.
  • A New Way to Classify Marine Habitat - July 30: NOAA announces a new standard language for characterizing habitats that has the potential to revolutionize how scientists study and manage our coasts, oceans, and Great Lakes.
  • Trawl Gear Modification—Preserving Fish Habitat - July 26: NOAA Fisheries scientists work with the Alaska Seafood Cooperative and flatfish fishing industry members to modify trawl gear, maintaining catch rates while protecting bottom habitat in the Bering Sea. Photo Credit: Diana Evans.
  • Northwest Science Center Deputy Director Announced - July 24: Today Dr. Mark Strom was announced as the permanent Northwest Fisheries Science Center Deputy Director.
  • Award-Winning Scientist Pioneers Turtle Research - July 23: Dr. Kyle S. Van Houtan, NOAA Fisheries research ecologist, was honored by the White House with a prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for his research on climate effects on sea turtles populations.
  • The Science Behind Restoring the Elwha - July 20: What is NOAA Fisheries role in restoring the Elwha River? What type of science goes into restoring a river? Watch this video to see first-hand the science involved.
  • Economic and Conservation Benefits of Catch Shares - July 19: The results from the first year of the West Coast Catch Share Program are in. Revenues are up, bycatch is down, and fishing is extended later in the season.
  • Three Ways You Are Connected to Deep-Sea Coral - July 16: In what ways are you connected to deep-sea corals? Why should you care about protecting them?
  • HabCam—A New Way to Survey Scallop Habitat - July 11: The Habitat Camera Mapping System snaps up to 500,000 images of the sea floor per day, taking roughly six images per second. Learn how this tool is helping provide better estimates for Atlantic sea scallops surveys without harming habitat.
  • Four Weird Ways to Restore Habitat - July 10: Discover several interesting and some weird ways that NOAA Fisheries is working to restore habitat for our nation's coastal ecosystems. 
  • NOAA Helps Indonesian Team Protect Sea Turtles - July 2: NOAA scientists and an Indonesian turtle monitoring team study leatherback sea turtle nesting populations in Papua, Indonesia, to learn more about population decline factors to protect this endangered species.
  • Teacher at Sea Helps Scientists Study Right Whales - June 28: NOAA Teacher at Sea Ellen O’Donnell shares incredible highlights of her research cruise studying North Atlantic Right Whales.
  • National Observer Program Annual Report Released - June 25: NOAA Fisheries releases the National Observer Program Annual Peport which shares nationwide statistics about number of sea days observed, activities, accomplishments, and goals for the observer program.
  • Shark Conservation in Our Global Oceans - June 21: Through international cooperation and state-of-the art technology, NOAA Fisheries is conducting joint research with Uruguay’s fisheries agency that is critical to inform international conservation and management decisions for pelagic sharks.
  • Bering Sea Research Reveals Changing Ecosystems - June 6: NOAA and partners conduct new research in the Bering Sea to examine how ecosystem changes are affecting our fisheries.
  • Turtle Bycatch Experiments Empower Students - May 29: Students have unique opportunity to work with NOAA Fisheries scientists to protect turtles from the impacts of fishing gear in Baja California, Mexico.
  • Making Sense of Fish Stock Assessments - May 23: NOAA Fisheries’ scientific stock assessments are key to fisheries management. They provide high-quality information to fisheries managers on the current status of fish stocks and future trends in fisheries productivity.
  • Ever Wonder What a Fisheries Observer Does? - April 30: NOAA Fisheries observers are a key part to smart fisheries management. Take a look at what they do and how we use data they collect on the water.
  • Fishermen and Scientists Work Toward Common Goal - April 22: NOAA Scientists and San Diego fishermen combine expertise and innovative tools to better understand depleted groundfish in the Southern California Bight.
  • Amazing Gray Whale Journey Across the Pacific - April 22: The Gray whale journey is one of the longest made by any mammal, covering over 12,000 miles round-trip, from the Alaskan Arctic to Mexico.
  • NOAA Invites Comment on Coral Reports - April 13: NOAA announces the availability of several coral documents for public review and comment in response to a petition to list 83 species of coral under the Endangered Species Act. Photo Credit: Arkive, Franco Banfi
  • FishSmart Workshops Help Solve Fishing Challenges - April 11: FishSmart Workshops—a proactive approach to developing techniques that reduce the mortality of fish stocks while enhancing the fishing experience.
  • Meet a Megamouth Shark Specialist - April 4: Meet Dr. Jose Castro, a NOAA scientist recently invited to help dissect a rare megamouth shark currently on display at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan. Megamouths are one of the most elusive shark species on the planet.
  • Making Angler Catch Count - April 2: The Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP) is changing the way we count and report what saltwater recreational fishermen are catching and how many trips they’re taking. Take a look at what improvements have been made thus far.
  • Catch Limits in Place for 2012 Fishing Season - Mar 9: This statement from Eric Schwaab, Deputy Administrator for Conservation and Management, highlights how NOAA Fisheries will have all Annual Catch Limits in place for federally managed fisheries for the 2012 fishing season.
  • 2012 Deep Sea Coral Report Released - Feb 24: NOAA releases 2012 Deep Sea Coral Report to Congress, highlighting the program's exciting discovery of deep-sea coral habitats which revealed new, currently unprotected deep-sea coral communities off the eastern and southern coasts of Florida.
  • Non-Native Species Impact Coasts - Feb. 24: Next week, National Invasive Species Awareness Week begins, held February 27-March 3. To kick off the event, NOAA's Peg Brady tells us more about aquatic invasive species, how they affect our coastlines, and why we need to be aware of them.
  • Scientists: 2007 Oil Spill Lethal to Fish Embryos - Jan. 5: NOAA scientists and partners recently reported that Pacific herring embryos in shallow waters died in unexpectedly high numbers following the 2007 Cosco Busan oil spill in San Francisco Bay.
  • NOAA Right Whale Experts Use Twitter to Reach Out - Nov. 16: As right whales migrate down the Atlantic Coast this winter to their winter calving grounds, there are things boaters can do to ensure their safe travels. To inform the public, NOAA whale experts took to Twitter.