Sign up for

FishNews

and other email updates

Fish

  • A Changing Climate in Fisheries Management - Feb 14: How will we manage fish populations as they move in response to climate change? NOAA Fisheries biologist John Manderson is working on one small piece of the puzzle.
  • Heart Failure in Fish Exposed to Oil Spills - Feb 13: Researchers from NOAA Fisheries and Stanford University find that some petroleum compounds act as ion channel blockers in the heart cells of young tuna, disrupting normal cardiac function.
  • NOAA Fisheries Publishes Bycatch Report Update - Feb 7: The U.S. National Bycatch Report First Edition Update 1 provides a national compilation of bycatch estimates for living marine resources (fish, marine mammals, sea turtles, seabirds, invertebrates) of the U.S. at the fishery and species level.
  • NOAA Announces Two New Habitat Focus Areas - Feb 4: NOAA has chosen two sites in the Pacific Islands—Guam and West Hawaii—as the next Habitat Focus Areas under NOAA’s Habitat Blueprint.
  • Climate and the Ultimate Pan-Fried Fish - Jan 28: How could a changing climate impact your favorite seafood? Researchers at The Ohio State University are currently studying the impact of climate change on fish in the Great Lakes.
  • Climate and Fish Sticks - Jul 24: Learn more about the connection between a changing climate and Alaska pollock, the primary fish stick fish.
  • Tagged Bluefin Tuna Recaptured After Sixteen Years - Jan 22: By tagging fish for NOAA’s Cooperative Tagging Program, fishermen have contributed greatly to our scientific understanding of many valuable species.
  • The Abundant—But Not So Tasty—Giant Grenadier - Jan 13: If giant grenadier were tasty, you’d likely find it on the menu at your favorite seafood restaurant. Instead, find out what scientists are learning about this prolific, albeit not so tasty, deep-water fish.
  • Our Year in Review: Top 13 Stories from 2013 - Dec. 17: It has been an exciting year at NOAA Fisheries. As we look forward to 2014, take a look back at our thirteen most popular stories from 2013.
  • Obama Announces Key ICCAT Post - Dec 16: President Obama has announced his intent to appoint Eugenio Piñeiro-Soler as U.S. Commercial Commissioner to The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT).
  • Endangered Species Act Turns 40 - Nov 22: This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act. Species diversity and ecosystem health are part of the natural legacy we leave for future generations, and the Act helps protect this legacy.
  • 2013 ICCAT Meeting Concludes - Nov 26: The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) concluded its annual meeting after adopting several new measures that will support the sustainable management of key species.
  • What's Happening to Our Coastal Wetlands? - Nov 21: The U.S. is losing wetland habitat at a rate of 7 football fields an hour. Learn more about wetland loss in the new report by NOAA and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.
  • Scientists on the Hunt for Sturgeon Spawning Areas - Nov 20: Sturgeon are spawning again in the Chesapeake Bay, but they’ve been gone so long that we’ve forgotten the basic life history information we need to boost their recovery. That’s about to change.
  • Feeds of the Future - Nov 5: Learn how researchers from NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are developing plant-based feeds with the right balance of proteins to replace fishmeal in aquaculture operations.
  • Our Annual Statistical Yearbook for U.S. Fisheries - Oct 30: Today, NOAA Fisheries releases Fisheries of the U.S., 2012. Continuing our rich scientific tradition, this is a statistical yearbook filled with facts and figures about our domestic fisheries.
  • Science Confirms Swordfish Abundance - Oct 31: A new 2013 international stock assessment confirms North Atlantic swordfish remains sustainable; resulting in a higher catch levels in U.S. waters.
  • Efforts to Support and Streamline Seafood Trade - Oct 28: NOAA Fisheries’ National Seafood Inspection Laboratory (NSIL) in Pascagoula, Mississippi, plays a critical role in streamlining seafood trade in and out of the United States. Find out how NOAA Fisheries supports seafood trade.
  • The Case of the Giant Oarfish - Oct 24: Listen to this fascinating interview with Dr. Russ Vetter, one of the NOAA biologists who necropsied the giant oarfish that washed up last week in California.
  • New Survey Identifies What Anglers Care Most About - Oct 24: What matters most to saltwater recreational anglers? Results from a new NOAA Fisheries survey aim to begin answering that question.
  • NOAA Awards $36 Million for Coastal Restoration - Oct 23: NOAA is awarding $36 million for more than 40 coastal habitat restoration projects across the United States. These projects will restore up to 16,000 acres of habitat, and open nearly 400 stream miles for fish passage.
  • Dig In—National Seafood Month - Oct 23: We're shining a national spotlight on the important role the seafood supply chain plays from the coast to the heartland and back again. In the U.S., sustainability is our standard, which makes us a global model.
  • NOAA Fisheries Announces New West Coast Region - Oct 21: NOAA Fisheries announces new West Coast Region—Northwest Region and Southwest Region unite to protect marine resources West Coast-wide.
  • Behind the Scenes: A Fisheries Research Expedition - Oct 18: NOAA scientists conduct fish surveys all along U.S. coasts. The data from these surveys are used to set sustainable catch limits, ensuring we can enjoy a healthy supply of seafood now and in the future. Get a first hand look at a fish survey.
  • Sustainable Seafood—A U.S. Success Story - Oct 18: The U.S. is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries and sustainable seafood. Watch this video to learn more about sustainability and how NOAA helps ensure our seafood is caught and farmed responsibly.
  • Fine Cooking on the High Seas - Oct 17: What does a chef aboard the NOAA research ship Oregon II feed a crew of 30 hungry seamen and scientists? Learn what seafood dishes chef Walter Coghlan likes to make the crew.
  • Two Takes on Climate Change in the Ocean - Sept 30: A pair of recent studies show how marine ecosystems are changing as ocean temperatures rise, and that the changes are happening more quickly than expected.
  • Meet Our Senior Science Advisors - Sept 26: Advanced science and technology is fundamental to NOAA Fisheries’ mission to protect our nation’s living marine resources. Meet our senior science advisors.
  • Rauch Testifies at Seafood Certification Hearing - Sept 24: Today NOAA Fisheries Acting Assistant Administrator Sam Rauch testified at the Senate Commerce Committee's hearing on "The Role of Certification in Rewarding Sustainable Fishing” at 10:30 EST.
  • Back in Black: Black Sea Bass Stock is Rebuilt - Sept 20: The southern stock of black sea bass has been successfully rebuilt and annual catch limits will now more than double.
  • Funding Innovation in Bycatch Reduction - Sept 19: Through its Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program, NOAA Fisheries recently funded 16 projects focused on the research and development of innovative approaches for reducing bycatch.
  • Fighting For Global Sustainable Fisheries - Sept 17: Pacific countries tackle illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing, and work to promote sustainable fisheries in the Coral Triangle region.
  • An Early Warning System for Ocean Tipping Points - Sept 3: A team of scientists and other experts is investigating the mechanics of ocean tipping points. That should help us to avoid tipping points—or to recover once they’ve been crossed.
  • Studying Influences on Gulf of Alaska Marine Life - Sept 3: The Gulf of Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Research Project is a five year study engaging oceanographers, fisheries biologists, and modelers who examine factors that influence five commercially important groundfishes.
  • New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts - Aug 27: According to the 2013 National Climate Assessment, the nation’s valuable ocean ecosystems and marine resources are already being impacted by a changing climate.
  • Sockeye Return to Washington's Yakima Basin - Aug 16: One hundred years. That’s how long it’s been since native sockeye populations inhabited the lakes of the Yakima Basin—until now. Photo Credit: Yakama Nation.
  • Hooked on Sharks - Aug 10: Can a special type of hook called a circle hook help vulnerable shark populations to recover? Scientists and fishermen team up to find out.
  • Shattering Shark Myths - Aug 8: Can you tell shark myth from fact? Better check this list out.
  • The Science Behind: A Shortfin Mako's Last Meal - Aug 6: Peer into a shark's stomach along with a NOAA Fisheries scientist and see what was on the menu for its last meal.
  • The Science Behind: Ageing a Shark - Aug 6: What does ageing the backbone of a shark entail? Catch NOAA Fisheries shark scientist Lisa Natanson in action.
  • 50 Years of Shark Research...and Counting - Aug 6: The Apex Predators turns 50 this year. Coastal surveys and cooperative tagging programs by federal fisheries scientists have contributed significantly to current knowledge of many shark species.
  • U.S. Leads the Way in Shark Conservation - Aug 3: A closer look at NOAA's role in shark conservation, management, and policy.
  • Shark Facts—Bite Off More Than You Can Chew - Aug 2: You already know sharks are fascinating creatures, but did you know...
  • Shark Conservation in the U.S. and Abroad - Jul 15: A closer look at how NOAA Fisheries is leading the way in the conservation and management of shark populations domestically and internationally.
  • Learn the “ABCs of Stock Assessment” - Jun 24: Watch our new sketch animation video, which tackles the often-misunderstood topic of stock assessments. Learn more about how we balance data and uncertainty in our approach to stock assessments.
  • Changing Sea Temps Affect Young Cod Food Supply - Jun 20: Changing sea water temperatures and circulation patterns have profoundly affected key Northeast zooplankton species in recent decades, and may be influencing the recovery of Atlantic cod and other fish stocks in the region.
  • Keeping An Eye On Pollock - Jun 10: Scientists and fishermen work together to understand how walleye pollock respond to a changing environment. This photo shows Dutch Harbor, Alaska, home to the Bering Sea walleye pollock fleet. Credit: NOAA
  • A Fisheries Observer with a Passion for Her Work - Jun 5: Fisheries observers, like fishermen, work hard at a job they believe in—making sure the nation’s seafood supply is sustainable.
  • NOAA Supports Unfettered Access for River Herring - May 30: Recently, the legislation to open fish passage on the St. Croix River for river herring became law. This photo is of an underwater school of herring in the St. Croix River. Credit: Ben Gahagan, CTDEEP.
  • Saving Coho Salmon: It's All About the Timing - May 17: As NOAA biologists work to re-establish runs of coho salmon in California, they aim to bring back some of the diversity of the wild populations that once thrived there.
  • NOAA Fisheries Launches New Rec Fishing Website - May 7: Explore recreational fishing information and resources, and learn how NOAA is working to support recreational fishermen.
  • New Report—"More Habitat Means More Fish" - May 7: NOAA announces the release of an illustrated report outlining the crucial role that habitat plays in keeping U.S. commercial and recreational fisheries strong.
  • Leading by Success—A Message on Status of Stocks - May 2: This month we turn the spotlight onto the continued success of the U.S. science-based fisheries management system established under the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA).
  • More Habitat Means More Fish - Apr 29: U.S. fisheries play an enormous role in the U.S. economy, and healthy freshwater, coastal, and marine habitats are essential to those fisheries.
  • Results of the Recent Hake Survey Are In - Apr 24: Last year, NOAA scientists and West Coast fishermen collaborated to reduce uncertainty in the Pacific hake fishery, improving near-term outlook for fishermen while protecting long-term availability of the fish.
  • How NOAA Observes Our Changing Earth - Apr 22: NOAA uses a variety of observational resources to gain more information about our evolving planet, including satellites, ships, planes, buoys, and on-the-ground scientists to provide data to better understand, and ultimately preserve, our earth.
  • Increasing Effective Habitat Conservation - Apr 22: NOAA and our partners have conserved nearly one billion acres of habitat essential to our valuable commercial and recreational fisheries. Read more from Buck Sutter, Director of NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation.
  • Beavers: Nature's 1st River Restoration Engineers - Apr 18: The same things beavers do naturally—cut down trees, dam up water, flood riverbanks—are exactly what we are trying to do to improve habitat for Pacific salmon.
  • New Video—From Gravel Pits to Salmon Habitat - Apr 15: California is looking at an innovative restoration method: reclaiming abandoned gravel pits as habitat for salmon.
  • Balancing the Needs of Farmers and Fish - Apr 15: The Russian River and its tributaries flowing through California’s wine country are in high demand. When farmers draw water for their vineyards, streams can dry up, stranding fish. See how NOAA is helping balance the needs of farmers and fish.
  • How Forecasting Frost Can Help Save Fish - Apr 15: Sonoma County wine growers have long battled crop-killing frost, and some ways to protect their vines use so much water from the nearby Russian River that they can hurt fish. Learn how NOAA’s National Weather Service found a way to help.
  • New "Fishways" Lead to Astounding Herring Increase - Apr 11: Since the 2007 installation of two fishways on Massachusetts' Acushnet River, scientists have observed an astounding 1,140 percent increase in the number of migrating herring able to access prime spawning grounds.
  • Technology Helps Fight Fraud—It’s No Joke - Apr 1: Learn how new traceability technology may help fight seafood fraud.
  • New Video Introduces Consumers to FishWatch - Mar 27: Our newest video introduces consumers to FishWatch.gov which provides easy-to-understand, science-based facts to help users make smart, sustainable seafood choices.
  • A New Structure for Observer Programs in Alaska - Mar 27: New regulations governing how observers are deployed into the fisheries of Alaska will increase the statistical reliability of data collected by the program, address cost inequality among fishery participants, and expand observer coverage.
  • Integrated Pelagic Survey Completed in Northeast - Mar 26: Researchers have completed the first comprehensive survey of the upper waters of the continental shelf off of the Northeast U.S. from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to the Nova Scotia Shelf, including Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine.
  • License to Krill: A Story About an Ecosystem - Mar 25: Antarctic krill are considered the greatest under-tapped biological resource in the ocean today. As humans increasingly turn to the oceans for food, we must be careful to not undermine the marine food chain.
  • Scientists Use Acoustic Technology to Study Cod - Mar 25: For the first time, NOAA researchers and colleagues report using acoustic monitoring technology to record spawning cod in the wild.
  • Improving Fish Passage on the Hudson River - Mar 20: Fisheries have long been an important resource on the Hudson River. Learn how NOAA Fisheries and partners are working to improve fish passage on the Hudson River.
  • Building a Better Fish Trap - Mar 19: A modern Minto Fish trap on the North Santiam River will protect listed steelhead and spring Chinook salmon as well as provide a safer environment for the biologists.
  • Magnuson-Stevens Reauthorization Efforts Underway - Nov 14: Learn more about our current and on-going efforts to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Act, which sets standards for conservation, management, and sustainable use of our nation’s fisheries resources. 
  • What Do Fish and Federal Highways Have in Common? - Mar 13: Find out how NOAA is working with the Federal Highway Administration to protect aquatic life. Photo courtesy of John McMillan.
  • NOAA Scientists Focus Research on Skate Nurseries - Mar 11: NOAA scientists will be keeping a closer eye on six skate nursery sites in the Bering Sea, following final action by members of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council at the February meeting in Portland, Oregon.
  • Farmed Seafood Profiles Now Available on FishWatch - Mar 11: FishWatch.gov now includes detailed information on farmed fish and shellfish. To learn more about farmed fisheries and how they are managed, explore the new farmed species profiles.
  • Catching Up With Catch Shares - Mar 4: A new fishery management program on the west coast gives fishermen greater flexibility and gives overfished species a break.
  • When One Endangered Species Eats Another - Jan 22: When one endangered species eats another, ecosystem-based management may be the only way to save them both: killer whales and chinook salmon.
  • Reintroducing Steelhead in Deschutes River Basin - Jan 16: Steelhead will once again be able to call Oregon's Deschutes River Basin home. NOAA will be proceeding with steelhead reintroduction efforts by designating a population as "experimental" under the Endangered Species Act.
  • Mark Twinam Fishes for Sharks Off Florida Coast - Jan 15: Mark Twinam fishes for large coastal sharks like hammerhead, lemon, and bull sharks in the Gulf of Mexico. Twinam is one of several fishermen helping NOAA research sharks in exchange for landing and selling a small quota of sandbar sharks.  
  • NOAA Identifies Nations for IUU Fishing - Jan 11: To ensure the U.S. fishing industry isn’t undermined by unsustainable, illegal activities, NOAA submitted a report identifying 10 nations whose fishing vessels engaged in illegal unreported, and unregulated fishing in 2011 or 2012.
  • Scientists Link Climate Change and Gray Snapper - Jan 8: NOAA scientists recently developed projections of gray snapper distribution under several climate change scenarios as they work to understand the effect of climate change on marine fisheries along the U.S. east coast.
  • New Opportunities to Improve Fish Passage - Jan 2: Find out how NOAA Fisheries will work with partners and stakeholders to improve upstream and downstream passage conditions for endangered and migratory fish on the Connecticut River.
  • Our Top 12 Stories From 2012 - Dec. 20: It has been an exciting year at NOAA Fisheries. As we look forward to 2013, take a look back at our twelve most popular stories from 2012.
  • Bob Dooley Fishes for Whiting off the West Coast - Dec 3: Bob Dooley fishes for Bering Sea pollock, Pacific cod, West Coast whiting, and dungeness crabs. In this photo, a fisherman hauls pollock onto the Pacific Prince, one of Dooley's vessels.
  • New Research to Reduce Rockfish Barotrauma Injury - Nov 28: See how our research on barotrauma—an injury that occurs when a hooked fish is brought too rapidly to the surface—is helping put rockfish back where they belong.
  • Fishery Data, On the Double - Nov 26: Collaboration between NOAA and the fishing industry allows for more efficient and accurate data collection in two valuable Pacific fisheries—hake and sardine.
  • Advancing Designs for Innovative Fish Passage - Nov 27: To facilitate fish passage in Washington's Baker River, NOAA Fisheries engineers worked closely with Puget Sound Energy to design an innovative fish passage system.
  • Tackling Seafood Fraud - Nov 15: Find out how NOAA's Office of Law Enforcement helps tackle seafood fraud.
  • United States and Morocco Shake Hands - Nov 13: The U.S. signed a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Morocco that sets the stage for collaboration on ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management and sustainable marine aquaculture.
  • ICCAT Meeting to Conserve and Manage Key Species - Nov 13: The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) starts its annual meeting in Agadir, Morocco to consider conservation measures for a variety of Atlantic marine species.
  • Meet a Fourth Generation Fisherman from Maine - Nov 7: Meet Terry Alexander, a fourth generation fisherman from Harpswell, Maine, who is collaborating with other fishermen, scientists, and the Gulf of Maine Research Institute to help revive redfish fishing.
  • Taking a Closer Look at Redfish - Nov 7: Check out our new redfish seafood profile on FishWatch.
  • Putting Local Fish Back On Our Plates - Nov 7: The Gulf Maine Research Institute has a new project called "Out of the Blue" which helps introduce lesser-known seafood to stagnant palates, while getting the market to demand this seafood.
  • Working Together to End IUU Fishing - Nov 2: Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing threatens the sustainability of our ocean ecosystems and fisheries. Combating IUU fishing is one of NOAA Fisheries’ top priorities.
  • Making Sense of Fish Stock Assessment Models - Oct 10: How do we make sure our nation's fisheries are sustainable and productive? It starts with fish stock assessment modeling—combining data to evaluate fish stock health necessary to inform fisheries management decisions.
  • The Surprising Sources of Your Favorite Seafoods - Oct 10: Our top ten favorite seafoods in the United States haven't changed much in the past several years, but you might be surprised at where they come from.
  • Ecosystem Factors and Assessments -
  • New Proposal to Protect Oceanic Whitetip Sharks - Oct 9: The United States co-sponsors a proposal to add oceanic whitetip sharks to Appendix II of the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).
  • New Research: Climate Impacts on Marine Predators - Sept 24: What happens when marine animals at the top of the food chain start to feel the impacts of climate change? This week Nature Climate Change features the results of research led by NOAA Fisheries scientist Elliott Hazen.
  • Scientists Develop Alternative Aquaculture Feeds - Sept 20: Researchers from NOAA and the US Department of Agriculture have been working on sustainable ingredients for fish feed. A report released this month, The Future of Aquafeeds, details their progress.
  • Statistical Report Card for U.S. Fisheries Posted - Sept 19: Wondering about the state of U.S. fisheries? NOAA Fisheries' annual report gives you the breakdown.
  • Leadership Highlights U.S. Fisheries Statistics - Sept 19: NOAA Fisheries posts a statistical yearbook, Fisheries of the U.S., 2011, filled with facts and figures about our domestic fisheries from 2011.
  • NOAA Finds Record Highs in Sea Surface Temperature - Sept 18: NOAA reports sea surface temperatures along the Northeast Continental Shelf were the highest ever recorded during the first six months of 2012.
  • The Science Behind What Sharks Eat - Sept 14: Scientists examine the stomach contents of shortfin mako, blue, and common thresher sharks to identify differences in foraging preferences across species and better understand impacts of environmental conditions based on these differences.
  • Teacher at Sea Studies the Science Behind Sharks - Sept 11: Teacher at Sea Steven Frantz shares highlights of his scientific cruise studying sharks and snappers on the 300th research mission of NOAA Ship Oregon II.
  • Funding Innovative Research to Reduce Bycatch - Aug 29: Through the Bycatch Reduction Engineering Program, NOAA Fisheries provides funds critical to key researchers and fishermen for the research and development of innovative approaches and strategies for reducing bycatch.
  • Bering Sea Skates Are Key To Alaska's Ecosystems - Aug 28: NOAA scientists propose six areas in the eastern Bering Sea as habitat areas of particular concern (HAPCs) for skates. Skates are important indicators of the health of Alaska's ecosystems.
  • Aquaculture Techniques Help Conserve White Abalone - Aug 27: A captive breeding program for endangered white abalone uses aquaculture techniques to establish a self-sustaining white abalone population in the wild.
  • New Survey Tool Shows Juvenile Scallop Abundance - Aug 24: NOAA researchers have seen high numbers of young sea scallops in Mid-Atlantic using the newest version of the HabCam, dubbed "the Seahorse" for its spiny profile. The tool gives a comprehensive view of the ocean floor.
  • Marine Aquaculture Critical to Seafood Supply - Aug 21: Fostering the development of marine aquaculture helps to supply safe seafood for people, support domestic wild fisheries, preserve and rebuild threatened and endangered species, and restore marine habitat.
  • Twitter #SharkChat @NOAALive with Shark Scientist - Aug 16: NOAA shark scientist Trey Driggers will answer questions live on Twitter this Thursday, August 16, at 2:00 p.m. Eastern. Trey conducts research on all kinds of sharks.
  • Circle Hooks: The Preferred Thresher Catcher? - Aug 15: NOAA scientists, anglers, and other institutions observe how thresher sharks are caught and released in Southern California—the key to long term conservation of the common thresher shark.
  • Sawfish—Cousins of the Shark - Aug 15: Sawfish have skeletons made of cartilage and shark-like bodies and gills. But during the past decade, these creatures have faced dramatic decline due to habitat loss and capture in fisheries.
  • Shark Conservation in Our Global Oceans - Aug 14: Through international cooperation and state-of-the art technology, NOAA Fisheries is conducting joint research with Uruguay’s fisheries agency that is critical to inform international conservation and management decisions for pelagic sharks.
  • Shark Mythbusters - Aug 13: Can you tell shark myth from fact? Better check this list out.
  • Dive into the Deep End of Shark Conservation - Aug 13: A closer look at how NOAA Fisheries works to conserve and manage shark populations domestically and internationally.
  • Shark Feature Stories - Aug 13: Can you tell shark myth from fact? Better check this list out.
  • Shark Tales—Adventures With A Shark Scientist - Aug 9: Ever wonder what it's like to study sharks for a living? NOAA Fisheries shark scientist Trey Driggers gives us details about his work.
  • Successful Tag Recovery from Huge Bluefin Tuna - Aug 8: NOAA scientists tagged an 8-foot, 400-pound bluefin tuna off the coast of Florida and retrieved the drifting tag at sea south of New York three months later. The data on this tag will provide rich details from the high seas adventures of one big tuna.
  • New Technology Helps Predict Harmful Algal Blooms - Aug 8: NOAA scientists use advanced technology to predict harmful algal blooms and provide warnings to aquaculture and other businesses.
  • Gloucester Mussel Farming Project Underway - Aug 6: NOAA Fisheries provided a grant earlier this year to support a mussel farm in federal waters off the coast of Massachusetts to engage local fishermen in aquaculture.
  • Captain Brings Fishermen to Striped Bass and More - July 31: Capt. Kalil Boghdan of Hamilton, Massachusetts, brings small groups of anglers on his shallow-draft outboard vessel to fish for striped bass and bluefish off the North Shore of Massachusetts.
  • Teacher at Sea Studies Marine Protected Areas - July 30: NOAA Fisheries' Teacher at Sea Marsha Skoczek shares highlights of her research cruise studying Marine Protected Areas off the Southeast Atlantic Coast.
  • Trawl Gear Modification—Preserving Fish Habitat - July 26: NOAA Fisheries scientists work with the Alaska Seafood Cooperative and flatfish fishing industry members to modify trawl gear, maintaining catch rates while protecting bottom habitat in the Bering Sea. Photo Credit: Diana Evans.
  • Five Fish Desperate for Healthy Habitat - July 24: Healthy habitat is the foundation for abundant fisheries and marine life. What five fish are desperate for healthy habitat? Find out which ones are on the list.
  • The Science Behind Restoring the Elwha - July 20: What is NOAA Fisheries role in restoring the Elwha River? What type of science goes into restoring a river? Watch this video to see first-hand the science involved.
  • Economic and Conservation Benefits of Catch Shares - July 19: The results from the first year of the West Coast Catch Share Program are in. Revenues are up, bycatch is down, and fishing is extended later in the season.
  • Healthy Habitat Foundation of Abundant Fisheries - July 16: At NOAA Fisheries, we are charged with taking care of our nation’s fish and living marine resources. But healthy marine life depends on healthy habitat—the places where these animals feed, grow, reproduce, and raise their young.
  • Last Annual Catch Limit Put in Place - July 2: On June 29, 2012, a significant milestone was achieved when NOAA Fisheries approved the last Fishery Management Plan amendment putting annual catch limits and accountability measures into place.
  • Building a Community Supported Fisheries Network - June 4: Commercial fishermen, fishing communities, and other organizations met in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, to broaden the success of community supported fishery programs.
  • Making Sense of Fish Stock Assessments - May 23: NOAA Fisheries’ scientific stock assessments are key to fisheries management. They provide high-quality information to fisheries managers on the current status of fish stocks and future trends in fisheries productivity.
  • NOAA Fisheries Leadership Message - May 2012 - May 14: NOAA Fisheries Acting Assistant Administrator, Sam Rauch, shares some good news on 2011 Status of the Stocks report to Congress.
  • Ever Wonder What a Fisheries Observer Does? - April 30: NOAA Fisheries observers are a key part to smart fisheries management. Take a look at what they do and how we use data they collect on the water.
  • Fishermen and Scientists Work Toward Common Goal - April 22: NOAA Scientists and San Diego fishermen combine expertise and innovative tools to better understand depleted groundfish in the Southern California Bight.
  • Today's Fresh Catch—Invasive Snakehead - April 22: Local seafood company and restaurant are battling invasive snakehead populations in a unique way—by creating a market for these fish and eating them.
  • NOAA Fisheries Leadership Message - April 2012 - April 19: NOAA Fisheries Acting Assistant Administrator, Sam Rauch, highlights Earth Week at NOAA Fisheries.
  • FishSmart Workshops Help Solve Fishing Challenges - April 11: FishSmart Workshops—a proactive approach to developing techniques that reduce the mortality of fish stocks while enhancing the fishing experience.
  • Meet a Megamouth Shark Specialist - April 4: Meet Dr. Jose Castro, a NOAA scientist recently invited to help dissect a rare megamouth shark currently on display at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan. Megamouths are one of the most elusive shark species on the planet.
  • Making Angler Catch Count - April 2: The Marine Recreational Information Program (MRIP) is changing the way we count and report what saltwater recreational fishermen are catching and how many trips they’re taking. Take a look at what improvements have been made thus far.
  • Meet Phil Harris, Black Cod Fisherman - Mar 9: This month, as part of NOAA’s Voices from the Waterfront series, we feature Phil Harris in Southern California Bight. Take a look at how this commercial fisherman delivers fresh sustainable fish to the public.
  • Restaurant Owner Dishes on Sustainability - Mar 9: Meet Laura Anderson, owner of Local Ocean Seafoods—a popular seafood restaurant on the waterfront in scenic Newport, Oregon—who shares her strong commitment to fresh, local seafood with her community and beyond.
  • Good News for West Coast Groundfish Catch Shares - Feb 22: West Coast commercial groundfish fishermen saw their revenues and efficiency increase substantially during the last year under a new fishery management system known as catch shares.
  • Study: Seafood Safe After Deepwater Horizon - Feb. 8: It’s been nearly two years since the Deepwater Horizon BP Oil Spill back in 2010. Now, a new NOAA science report released this week show that Gulf seafood is safe.
  • New Protections in Place for Atlantic Sturgeon - Jan. 31: NOAA’s Fisheries Service announced a final decision to list five distinct population segments of Atlantic sturgeon under the Endangered Species Act.
  • New Method Improves Recreational Catch Estimates - Jan 25: NOAA today announced it has begun to use an improved method to estimate the amount of fish caught by saltwater anglers, which will allow rules that fishermen follow to be based on more accurate information.
  • Public Invited to Review Climate Change Strategy - Jan. 19: Together with state, tribal, and federal agency partners, the Obama Administration today released a draft national strategy to help prepare for and help reduce the impacts of climate change on species, ecosystems, and the people that depend on them.
  • Final Recovery Plan Issued for Steelhead Trout - Jan. 12: NOAA Fisheries Service issued a final Recovery Plan designed to stabilize and eventually restore steelhead trout numbers in coastal streams from the Santa Maria River in Santa Barbara County south to the United States and Mexico border.
  • Schwaab: Catch Limit Milestone Now within Reach - Jan. 9: This statement from Eric Schwaab, Assistant Administrator for NOAA Fisheries, highlights how NOAA Fisheries will have all Annual Catch Limits in place for federally managed fisheries before the start of the 2012 fishing season.
  • Scientists: 2007 Oil Spill Lethal to Fish Embryos - Jan. 5: NOAA scientists and partners recently reported that Pacific herring embryos in shallow waters died in unexpectedly high numbers following the 2007 Cosco Busan oil spill in San Francisco Bay.
  • Year-end Interview with Eric Schwaab - Dec. 30: To end 2011, NOAA's Assistant Administrator for Fisheries pauses to reflect on his love of fishing, and to answer some of the year's most frequently asked NOAA Fisheries questions.
  • Dead Zones Lead to Shrinking Billfish Habitat - Dec 9: The science behind counting fish in the ocean has never been simple. Now, a new scientific paper authored by eight scientists, including a NOAA biologist, illustrate how ocean dead zones and climate change make counting fish even more complex.
  • Scientists, Anglers Work to Stop Thresher Tailspin - Dec 6: The Southern California coast is hot spot for the thresher shark, a recreational fishing favorite. Now, anglers and scientists are working to save this species using better methods to reel them in.
  • Reminder: Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Regulations - Nov. 22: Recently, a New England groundfish vessel incidentally caught an 881-pound bluefin tuna in a trawl net. Find out more about how the situation was handled by NOAA and what happens when bluefin tuna is caught by accident.
  • NOAA: Significant Progress Made at ICCAT - Nov. 21: In a statement released today by Russell F. Smith III, NOAA Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Fisheries, talks about the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas made significant progress on key U.S. priorities last week.
  • Fishermen ‘Get Smart’ about Reducing Bycatch - Nov 17: NOAA presented the grand prize at World Wildlife Fund’s 2011 International Smart Gear Competition today in Seattle. The competition recognized three fishing devices that save lives of seabirds, fish, turtles, and other marine life.
  • 'Top Chef' Contestant Cooks Up Sustainable Seafood - Oct. 21: More than 200,000 visitors travelled to Morehead City, North Carolina this month to celebrate seafood. Among the chefs at this year's festival, was Keith Rhodes, one of the contestants from the popular BRAVO reality TV show, "Top Chef."
  • Scientists Track the Gulf Sturgeon Stampede - Oct. 20: Cool fall temperatures signal to Gulf sturgeon that it’s time to migrate. That means NOAA Fisheries scientists are on their trail, determined to better understand these mysterious fish.